Commercial Vs. Residential Wiring

Residential vs Commercial Wiring If you’ve never done any electrical work on your own, you might be under the impression that residential and commercial wiring are one and the same. But this couldn’t be any further from the truth. Since residential properties typically have much different electrical demands than commercial ones, there are lots of differences that separate residential and commercial electrical wiring. Check out a few of the key differences between the two below.

The designs for residential and commercial electrical wiring are different.

In most instances, residential electrical wiring has a single-phase design. It consists of three wires, including a positive wire, a negative wire, and a neutral wire, and they’re capable of carrying 120 volts. The only exception is when the electrical wiring is connected to a large appliance like an air conditioner or a washer and dryer. In that case, residential wiring utilizes a two-phase design that can carry 240 volts. But when it comes to commercial electrical wiring, a three-phrase design is the preferred option. This type of system includes two legs that can carry 120 volts each and another leg that can run 208 volts.

The location of residential and commercial electrical wiring is different, too.

Residential wiring is usually hidden inside of most homes. The only way you can find it is by taking down part of a wall or crawling into an attic or crawlspace. Commercial wiring, on the other hand, is often put in more accessible places. For example, you’ll often find commercial wiring in the ceiling rafters of a commercial property where it can be serviced quickly and easily.

Residential and commercial wiring also have different insulations.

Residential electrical wiring is almost always covered up with sheath insulation before it’s installed. But commercial electrical wiring is typically covered with a more heavy-duty type of insulation called TTHT. It’s specifically designed to protect commercial electrical wiring from liquids, corrosive gases, and more.

There are some electricians who only work on residential wiring. There are others who specialize in commercial wiring. However, at Always on Electric, we do both. We offer residential electrical services as well as commercial electrical services to our clients. Call us at 970-309-2616 today to schedule services for your home or business.

An Overview of Short Circuits and What Your Response Should Be

Short Circuits It’s not all that uncommon for homeowners to be forced to deal with short circuits in their electrical systems. However, short circuits should not be taken lightly. If you ever experience a short circuit in your home, it’s a good idea to have an electrician come out to make the necessary repairs. Here is a brief overview of what short circuits are, what they’re caused by, and how they can affect you.

What exactly is a short circuit?

A short circuit in your electrical system takes place when a wire that’s carrying an electrical current comes into contact with another wire or portion of a circuit, thus giving the electrical current a less resistant path than before. It brings the distance between two conductive points down and results in more heat being produced by the electricity.

What causes a short circuit?

Short circuits in your electrical system can be caused by any number of things. If your electrical wires aren’t insulated properly, it could cause a short circuit. Short circuits can also be caused by loose connections in your system and pests that have chewed through wires. Older appliances can also cause short circuits to occur.

Why is a short circuit dangerous?

Short circuits in your electrical system are dangerous because they allow for larger amounts of electricity to run throughout your home. That electricity can generate a lot of heat and lead to a fire if you don’t have short circuits fixed. Short circuits can also force you to make costly repairs to appliances and damage other electrical equipment.

Don’t ignore the signs of a short circuit in your home. Always on Electric can make short circuits a thing of the past by inspecting your electrical system and repairing it. Call us at 970-309-2616 to schedule an appointment if you suspect short circuits could be present in your electrical system.

When is it Time to Upgrade Your Electrical Wiring?

Electrical Wiring Most people don’t think much about the electrical wiring in their home, unless or until something goes wrong. For instance, the big football game is coming up on TV and people are gathered at your house to see it. A couple minutes before the game starts the TV inexplicably turns off. Nothing seems to work to get it back on. Maybe it was a blown fuse? Maybe it was something else? Whatever it was, it’s frustratingly irritating!

Signs You Need to Upgrade Your Electrical Wiring

When is it time to upgrade your electrical wiring? For most people, if their house is over 40 years old, then it’s time. Things have changed a lot since the original electrical work was installed. Think about how much different our world is today– back then, they didn’t have the kind of devices and appliances we have now, like microwaves, desktop computers, and tablets. Furthermore, if you have several people living in a house trying to plug all their stuff in at once, you might have run out of outlets– so it’s time to expand the number of outlets in your home to properly accommodate the power needs of all the people who live there.

One thing that might scare you– and it should– is that faulty wiring is a leading cause of house fires. This isn’t just some made-up fact; researchers studied this topic and published their findings in a 2009 study by the National Fire Prevention Association. The conclusion? The older your house is, the more likely the wiring is outdated and/or unsafe… which could very well lead to a fire. You don’t want that. You want wiring that’s “up to code,” or, more importantly, up to the current code.

When’s the last time your wiring was professionally inspected? Most of you would say, “I have no idea.” Others might say, “When we first bought the house.” If it has been “some time” since it was checked, make it a priority this year to have a company like Always On Electric come take a look at what’s going on in your house with your electrical wires.

You’ll especially want to have your wiring checked if you’ve noticed fuses are blowing repeatedly, lights are flickering or dimming, you smell burning coming from a certain room or appliance, or– don’t laugh– you get a tingling sensation when you touch a certain appliance.

Your wiring should also be inspected if you’ve noticed particularly warm outlets or ones that have become discolored or spark when you plug things into them.

Call 970-309-2616 to connect with Always On Electric.